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Awqaf SA and Crescent of Hope offer ‘historic’ outreach

Awqaf SA and Crescent of Hope are supporting the elderly in the charming bushveld town Marble Hall, 29km from Groblersdal in Limpopo Province. Forty senior citizens resident at the Loskopvallei Rusoord are beneficiaries of sterilisable mattresses, crockery and kitchen utensils to the value of R70 000. These items were needed for the day-to-day use of the residents but fell outside the budget of the institution. The Loskopvallei Rusoord is a registered non-profit organisation in a historically Afrikaner group area, now open to all senior citizens, even beyond the immediate boundaries of Marble Hall. It is a 24-hour frail care facility that includes medical care and it is compliant with the provisions of the relevant legislation as well as the regulations of the Department of Social Development. Their services include religious support programmes for the elderly, irrespective of faith. The facility also relies on the support of volunteers and specialists like dietitians. Faizel Ismail, co-ordinator of Crescent of Hope, told the media that Awqaf SA and Crescent of Hope recognise the opportunity of serving the poor and needy beyond the conventional beneficiary base. “By reaching out to our needy senior citizens in areas like Marble Hall we are broadening the definition of inclusive engagement that nurtures social cohesion,” said Ismail. Crescent of Hope was founded in 1992 during the Somali refugee crisis in Kenya. The organisation’s work is focused on activities such as educational projects and disaster relief programmes. Zeinoul Cajee, CEO at Awqaf SA says, “By reaching out to diverse ...

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Cape Town’s Muslims Pushing Back Day Zero: Awqaf SA’s Water Conservation Project

Cape Town, situated at the foot of Africa, is the southernmost city in a water-stressed region. Graced by a Mediterranean climate of hot, dry summers and cold, wet winters, Cape Town has always been dependent on its winter rainfall to get through the dry months of October to April. Already victim to drought cycles, the Western Cape – the area surrounding Cape Town – has been hit by three years of below-average rainfall and deepening climate change, exacerbated by the El-Nino-La-Nina effect, the warming or cooling of the Pacific, which impacts on global weather systems. An example of how devastating the drought has been is indicated by average rainfall figures at Cape Town International Airport. Whilst the normal average precipitation per annum has been just over 500mm, this year saw only 120mm rain falling, and the dams reflecting only 30% of capacity at winter’s end. Coupled with political bickering by the Democratic Alliance (DA), which governs the region, and the African National Congress (ANC), which controls national government, the 6 million citizens of the Cape have been the victims. Warnings about Cape Town running out of water due to increasing demands and population densities have been circulating since the 1970s, and more recently, in 1990 and 2007, when it was finally predicted that if something was not done about increasing capacity, the city’s taps would run dry between 2012 and 2015. Running on models that Cape Town would only see its ‘Day Zero’ in 2022, the city authorities did institute ...

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